Studio City

Studio City, CA Real Estate

Studio City is a historic neighborhood within the city of Los Angeles, California, in the San Fernando Valley, known for the number of celebrities who have been seen or who reside there. Its low-density residential district includes an older-aged, 78% white, well-educated, high-income population with a relatively high percentage of military veterans. Within its borders are six private and five public schools.

The 2000 U.S. census counted 34,034 residents in the 6.31-square-mile Studio City neighborhood—or 5,395 people per square mile, among the lowest population densities for the city. In 2008, the city estimated that the resident population had increased to 37,201.

In 2000 the median age for residents was 38, considered old for city and county neighborhoods; the percentages of residents age 19 and older were among the county’s highest.

The neighborhood was considered “not especially diverse” ethnically, with a high percentage of white residents. The breakdown was whites, 78%; Latinos, 8.7%; Asians, 5.4% ; blacks, 3.7%; and others, 4.1%. Iran (7%) and the United Kingdom (6.7%) were the most common places of birth for the 21.1% of the residents who were born abroad—a low percentage for Los Angeles.

The median yearly household income in 2008 dollars was $75,657, considered high for the city. The percentage of households that earned $125,000 and up was high for Los Angeles County. The average household size of 1.9 people was low when compared to the rest of the city and the county. Renters occupied 55.9% of the housing stock and house- or apartment-owners held 44.1%.

In 2000 there were 837 families headed by single parents, the rate of 11.2% being low for the city of Los Angeles. There were 2,591 veterans, or 8.8% of the population, a high figure for the city.

Originally known as Laurelwood, the area Studio City occupies was formerly part of Rancho Ex-Mission San Fernando. This land changed hands several times during the late 19th Century and was eventually owned by J. B. Lankershim and eight other developers who organized the Lankershim Ranch Land and Water Company. In 1899, however, the area lost most water rights to Los Angeles and was no longer viable for farming.

Construction of the Los Angeles Aqueduct began in 1908 and water reached the San Fernando Valley in November, 1913. Real estate boomed, and a syndicate led by Harry Chandler, business manager of the Los Angeles Times, with Hobart Johnstone Whitley, Isaac Van Nuys, and James Boon Lankershim acquired the remaining 47,500 acres (192 km2) of the southern half of the former Mission lands—everything west of the Lankershim town limits and south of present day Roscoe Boulevard excepting the Rancho Encino. Whitley platted the area of present day Studio City from portions of the existing town of Lankershim as well as the eastern part of the new acquisition. In 1927, Mack Sennett began building a new studio on 20 acres donated by the land developer.  The area around the studio was named Studio City. In 1955, Studio City’s Station 78 became the first racially integrated station in the Los Angeles City Fire Department.

source: wikipedia.org


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Studio City - Market Stats

National and County-wide news sources are slow and do not accurately represent what is happening in Studio City area. My Statistics are updated every few days to keep you up to date.